Archive for December, 2003

Interesting email client: Mulberry

December 31, 2003

I’m trying out the Mulberry email client from Cyrusoft. It’s supposedly the “premier” IMAP client. It’s multi-platform (Unix/Mac/Windows) and it shows. Navigation is awkward because it doesn’t follow the Windows navigation model but, aside from that, it’s pretty good. It’s pricey — $35 if I recall. No, $35 isn’t a lot of money but, given that Thunderbird is free as is Outlook Express, it’s a lot of money.
Anyone have other alternatives?

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RFC2646: Content-Type: Text/plain; format=flowed

December 31, 2003

Ever see a plain text email whose formatting is such that words and quoting are all ragged and difficult to read? This RFC attempts to address that. Which email clients honor this setting? Well, Mulberry and Thunderbird appear to. Not sure about any others but I imagine if PINE doesn’t now, it will in the next rev.

Darwinports?

December 30, 2003

Hmm … I’ve gotta check out DarwinPorts for OS X. Looks like it might be similar to some of the packages that help download/update open software on other platforms (Cygwin and RPMFind come to mind).

On the hunt for a new email client

December 30, 2003

I’ve been using Thunderbird as my primary email client for a couple of months now. I started with the released version and then moved on to daily builds. I still use Outlook to maintain my contacts and calendar but I rarely use it to manage my email because, well, it’s too dangerous and, since I’m on dial-up, too slow. Too dangerous because of all the HTML-based email viruses (virii?), the web beacons and the other sneaky things that marketing types put in their mailings (if it were easier to switch between HTML and plain-text mode these things wouldn’t be as much of an issue for me). Too slow because … well, I don’t know why it’s too slow but when I’m at home on my dial-up connection it takes a lot longer to sync up my IMAP email than when I’m on broadband. No, it’s not just a dial-up/broadband difference! — Thunderbird gives me quite acceptable performance whether I’m on dial-up or broadband. And my settings are the same in both cases — I don’t download the message bodies, just the headers.
Anyway, Thunderbird is a great client but as they continue with their development the UI is slowing down a bit so I’m looking for a new email client. Prior to Thunderbird I used Pine almost exclusively and I still use it as my backup client. I’ve been looking at PocoMail. If anyone has recommendations either post a comment or drop me an email. You can use comments — at — tonys-links — dot — com.

Another hotspot finder

December 26, 2003

Wi-FiHotSpotList.com (one of the sites by Internet.com).
Don’t be fooled! CNet‘s hotspot locator is done by the same folks that do Intel’s. It’s cnet.jwire.com vs. intel.jwire.com. I haven’t confirmed it but I suspect they use the same database.

D-Link DI-624 emulator

December 24, 2003

I know it sounds weird but D-Link has a web-based emulator for their DI-624 802.11g router. I intend to upgrade my 802.11b setup in the very near future so having something like this available is very helpful and increases my regard for D-Link. The feature set and configurability of this router is pretty impressive. And it’s cheaper than the Netgear WGT614.

Panther StartupItems

December 20, 2003

Apple’s Panther has introduced a new way to create StartupItems and it’s discussed in this article from the Apple developer site.

OS X boot process

December 20, 2003

Ever wonder what happens when a Mac boots OS X? More than you ever wanted to ever know is revealed in this article from the Apple developer site. The article concentrates on startup — those processes that take place after the operating system is loaded and contains useful information like rc.boot as well as pointers to other useful Apple developer articles on things like how User Sessions are initialized and what happens during logout, shutdown and restart. It also shows a table of common system daemons and Core startup items.

Cardfile.org : keep tabs on friends info

December 19, 2003

Cardfile.org just launched. It’s free. You create an account and enter your contact information and they provide an RSS feed that your friends can subscribe to so they’ll know when you change phone number, email address, postal address, IM account name, all that kinda stuff. They give you the HTML you need to stick on your site so your friends can get to your information easily. In addition your friends can download your contact information in VCF format. And if you can get your friends to sign up you can add them to your list of tracked contacts.
No, the idea isn’t perfect. I wouldn’t put the supplied HTML on any web page anywhere, for instance … at least not for my personal contact information. And there have been a lot of companies that’ve tried this in the past and died away. Hopefully they’ll listen to feedback and this one will stick cause the basic idea is a really good one.

Walmart does downloads

December 19, 2003

Walmart‘s doing music downloads for 88 cents per track.